Candy Canes? Yes Please!

candy cane heart

Happy December 1st everyone! Only 24 days until Christmas, and like me I’m sure you all love a good candy cane. Or two. Or ten. These days, it’s my boyfriends most favorite treat. Our kisses have been extra special and minty too. Wink.

In honor of this lovely treat, I decided to do a bit of research on the subject! I found out some interesting things actually, of which I shall share with all of you lovely people. Most every site I searched, had the same story.

Birth of the Candy Cane

Around the seventeenth century, European-Christians began to adopt the use of Christmas trees as part of their Christmas celebrations. They made special decorations for their trees from foods like cookies and sugar-stick candy. The first historical reference to the familiar cane shape goes back to 1670, when the choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral in Germany, bent the sugar-sticks into canes to represent a shepherd’s staff. The all-white candy canes were given out to children during the long-winded nativity services.

The clergyman’s custom of handing out candy canes during Christmas services spread throughout Europe and later to America. The canes were still white, but sometimes the candy-makers would add sugar-roses to decorate the canes further.

The first historical reference to the candy cane being in America goes back to 1847, when a German immigrant called August Imgard decorated the Christmas tree in his Wooster, Ohio home with candy canes.

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The Stripes

About fifty years later the first red-and-white striped candy canes appeared. No one knows who exactly invented the stripes, but Christmas cards prior to the year 1900 showed only all-white candy canes. Christmas cards after 1900 showed illustrations of striped candy canes. Around the same time, candy-makers added peppermint and wintergreen flavors to their candy canes and those flavors then became the traditional favorites.

May all your kisses, taste of peppermint 😉

Peace, love & sarcasm,

Becky

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